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Battle of Symbols: Global Dynamics of Advertising, Entertainment and Media

By: John Fraim

$26.00

Symbols increasingly dominate international communication. The events of 9/11 and the ongoing war against terrorism demonstrate their power.

1 in stock

SKU: 385630620X Categories: ,

Description

Symbols increasingly dominate international communication. The events of 9/11 and the ongoing war against terrorism demonstrate their power. Yet few understand them. Now, more than ever, it is important to understand symbols in a global context. Battle of the Symbols examines 9/11 and current events in light of global symbolism. While 9/11 represented the beginning of the war against terrorism, the real “battle of symbols” started long before September 11th and will continue long after the fall of Osama bin Laden or Saddam Hussein.

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Publisher:Daimon Verlag
Binding:Paperback
Volume(s):1
About the Author:John Fraim is President of The GreatHouse Company, a marketing consulting firm and book publisher. He is a leading authority on symbolism and the creator of www.symbolism.org, one of the internet's most popular sites for symbolism. His writing has appeared in a number of publications and online journals including Business2.0, The Industry Standard, Ad Busters, The Journal of Marketing, First Monday, Spark OnLine, Media & Culture Journal, The Journal of Psychohistory, Anthropology News and Psychological Perspectives. His book Spirit Catcher won the 1997 Small Press Award for Best Biography. He has a BA in History form UCLA and a JD from Loyola Law School.
Product Dimensions:5.5 x 1.1 x 8.2 inches
Pages:418
Publication Date:April 1, 2003