Image from The Red Book

The C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles offers a Certificate Program in Jungian Studies for licensed mental health professionals only, which extends over a ten-month period beginning in September 2019 and ending in June 2020 It is structured around seminar courses on Saturdays, once a month, from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm, each focused on a current topic in Analytical Psychology.

Case Consultation: The case conferences provide an opportunity for discussion and integration of theoretical and clinical material. This part of the Certificate Program is mandatory. Students have the option of either a monthly Sunday morning group from 10:30 am – 12:00 pm, or small groups to be arranged at individual analysts’ offices during the week.

The class is intended for licensed mental health professionals, including Psychologists, Clinical Social Workers, and Marriage and Family Therapists.

Continuing Education:

Psychologists/MFTs/LCSWs/MFCCs: The C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for Psychologists. The C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Nurses: The C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles is an accredited provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing (Provider #07986).

A maximum of 75 CE credits can be earned (60 for the seminar courses on Saturday, 15 for the case conferences) based on class attendance.

Sandplay: Part of the Continuing Education units can also be counted toward certification as a Sandplay therapist with the Sandplay Therapists of America. The number of hours is to be determined.

Certificate: A Certificate in Jungian Studies will be awarded to participants after completion of the program. Participants may miss 2 classes and still receive the certificate.

 


Schedule of Seminar Courses

Saturday, September 14, 2019; 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Early Influences on Jung’s Philosophical, Clinical, and Religious Outlook

Presented by Charles T. Zeltzer, Ph.D.

This program focuses on some of the formative influences on Jung’s approach to the psyche. In addition to examining how romantic philosophy shaped Jung’s worldview, we will review his early clinical experiences. The thinking of such seminal psychologists as Janet, Bleuler, and Freud, among others, will be examined for their influence on how Jung conceptualized the structure of the psyche, psychological dynamics, complex theory, and the process of individuation. Jung’s early dreams and visions will provide the foundation for an examination of his perspective on the relationship between religion and psychology.

Learning Objectives:

  • Name the idea of Kant’s that most influenced Jung’s view of the psyche.
  • List two ideas of C.G. Carus that influenced Jung.
  • Describe the relationship between Jung’s work with schizophrenics and his conceptualization of psychic structure.
  • Name 3 areas of agreement between Freud and Jung.
  • Describe how the word association test influenced Jung’s therapeutic technique.
  • Describe what Jung means by, “the religious function of the psyche.”

Charles T. Zeltzer, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist and has been a certified Jungian analyst since 1992. He is currently in private practice, with offices in Ventura and Santa Monica, California. He was the Director of Training at the C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles. He has spoken throughout the United States and Europe on the body in relation to the inner journey of encountering early trauma. He has also lectured on many aspects of the religious dimension of the psyche, including alchemy, Kundalini Yoga, the Roman Catholic Mass as an alchemical process, and the role of the alchemical god Mercurius in our everyday lives.


Saturday, October 12, 2019; 10:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Introduction to The Red Book and Exploration of Shadow and Complexes

Presented by Paula Smith-Marder, Ph.D.

Many of Jung’s psychological ideas originated early in his career as he developed The Red Book, a rich exploration of the unconscious based on his technique of active imagination that spanned the course of many years.  With this in mind, we will reflect upon The Red Book, and Jung’s experiences in writing it.  We will consider basic elements of analytical psychology, focusing specifically on the psychological shadow and complexes and ways of addressing these within the context of the analytic process.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the significance of The Red Book as it relates to Jung’s later writings on psychology.
  • Explain what Jung means by active imagination, and give an example of how it may be used today in working with an obsessive thought or a destructive impulse.
  • Describe what is meant by the shadow and give a clinical example.
  • Identify shadow material in a dream.
  • Describe what is meant by a complex and give a clinical example.
  • Explain what is meant by a complex having an autonomous nature.

Paula Smith-Marder, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst and clinical psychologist in private practice in Westwood. She is on the faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles and is past Director of Training of the Analyst Training Program. She lectures frequently on women’s dreams, animal imagery, and Mary in contemporary culture.


Saturday, November 9, 2019; 10:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Jung’s Red Book:  The Transformation of the Psychotherapy Process

Presented by J. Gordon Nelson, Ph.D.

Through the process of active imagination Jung encountered the archetypal world of the psyche which profoundly changed him and the way in which he thought about the unconscious.  Drawing from the steps of the individuation process as described by Jung in Two Essays (Volume 7 of the Collected Works) as well as The Red Book, a collection of his painted images and written reflections, we will examine some of the ways in which Jung developed his ideas about the unconscious, including the archetypes, the role of complexes, and the notion of the Self.  We will examine some of the ways in which to help patients develop their own relationship with the unconscious which includes the integration of the shadow, the parts of the self which are often disowned or defended against because they are felt to be too painful to be tolerated by the ego.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe what is meant by the individuation process.
  • Describe what is meant by the term archetype and give an example of an archetypal process.
  • Describe what is meant by the term complex, and how it can be expressed in a clinical setting.
  • Describe what is meant by a shadow projection, how to identify it in the therapeutic setting.
  • Describe how Jung’s confrontation with the unconscious helped to shape his theory of psychology.
  • Describe the difference between the personal and the collective unconscious.

J. Gordon Nelson, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst and educational psychologist in Santa Monica. He has taught the complete C. G. Jung Collected Works Reading Program many times, as well as many individual training courses on Jung here, and other professional psychology graduate schools. He is a former president of the C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles, and Chair of its Certifying Board for new analysts.


Saturday, December 14, 2019; 10:00 am – 11:45 am

Introduction to Sandplay Therapy

Presented by Marion Anderson, Ph.D.

This presentation will provide the basic foundations of working with images in therapy, including Jung’s idea of the self-healing aspect of the psyche, the notion of the Self, and the function of the symbol as a bridge between the conscious and unconscious.  A brief history of Sandplay and case examples will be included.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the concept of the Self.
  • Give an example of the function of a symbol in a Sandplay case.
  • Give an example of how Sandplay can be helpful in a specific clinical situation.

Marion Anderson, Ph.D., is a Jungian Analyst and clinical psychologist in private practice in Santa Monica. She is a certified Sandplay therapist and teacher who has lectured nationally and internationally. She has published articles in the Journal of Sandplay Therapy, served as the co-coordinator of the Sandplay community of Los Angeles group, and gives workshops on painting inner images at the Jung Institute.

Saturday, December 14, 2019; 11:45 am – 2:15 pm

Some Considerations at the Initial Sessions with a Child

 Presented by Sachiko Taki-Reece, Ed.D., M.F.T.

In working with children, it is critical that the therapist establish a therapeutic alliance with the parent and/or caregiver, which includes helping them learn to identify and help the child manage challenging feelings.  A secondary goal would be to support the child’s caregiver to learn to use play as a way to mirror, and communicate back to the child an understanding of his or her emotional states of mind.  Using Kalff’s stages of ego development, we will examine some of the ways in which to identify and assess children based on the ways they are interacting and creating scenes in the sand.

 Learning Objectives:

  • List 3 factors which can help parents learn to identify and reflect their child’s emotional state.
  • Using Kalff’s stages of emotional development, describe how to assess a child at the initial Sandplay session.

Sachiko Taki-Reece, Ed.D., M.F.T., is a Jungian Analyst, in private practice in Silver Lake where she also offers supervision. A member of the teaching faculty at the C. G Jung Institute of LA, she has published several research articles on Sandplay, as well as book chapters in both English and Japanese.

Saturday, December 14, 2019; 2:15 pm – 4:00 pm

A Rite of Passage into Womanhood Through Sandplay

Presented by Harriet Friedman, M.A.

In today’s culture, initiatory rites are almost non-existent, and life transitions are often not formally celebrated. This presentation of a young girl’s Sandplay case will focus on her development into womanhood utilizing the personal and archetypal imagery which emerged during her treatment.

Learning Objectives:

  • Give an example of personal imagery and themes which were reflected in this patient’s sandplay trays.
  • Give an example of archetypal imagery and themes which were reflected in this patient’s sandplay trays.
  • Describe how the personal and archetypal imagery changed over time utilizing images from the patient’s sandplay trays.

Harriet S. Friedman, M.A., M.F.T., is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in West Los Angeles. A founding member of Sandplay Therapists of America, Board Member of the International Society of Sandplay Therapy, she has also served on the Board of the Jung Institute of Los Angeles, and Director of the Hilde Kirsch Children’s Center. She is co-author of Sandplay: Past, Present and Future and Supervision of Sandplay Therapy together, as well as published numerous journal articles and book chapters.  She serves on the faculty at the Jung Institute of Los Angeles, and lectures nationally and internationally on the connections between personal and archetypal material in the therapeutic setting.


Saturday, January 11, 2020; 10:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Jung’s Typology

Presented by Steve Galipeau, M.A., M.Div.

This seminar will explore the roots of Jung’s theories about typology including his correspondence with Hans Schmid, his reflections on typological significance of different psychological theories, and his personal explorations of typology in The Red Book. It will offer a summary of the typology Jung outlines in Psychological Types (Volume 6 of the Collected Works) as well as later developments in typology as seen in the Myers Briggs Type Indicator and the work of analysts such as John Giannini and John Beebe. Special attention will be given to such topics as the type couplings, the inferior function, the feeling function, and cultural complexes as seen through the lens of typology.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the origins of C. G. Jung’s theory of psychological types.
  • Identify the two attitude types and the four functions of consciousness.
  • Explain how the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator identifies individual typology.
  • Assess the role of typology in interpersonal relationships.
  • Assess how typology plays out in cultural differences.
  • Identify issues involving one’s typology, especially the inferior function.

Steven Galipeau, M. A., M. Div. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Woodland Hills and Executive Director of Coldwater Counseling Center in Studio City. The author of The Journey of Luke Skywalker: An Analysis of Modern Myth and Symbol and Transforming Body and Soul: Therapeutic Wisdom in the Gospel Healing Stories, Steve has lectured nationally and internationally on a variety of topics related to Analytical Psychology.


Saturday, February 8, 2020; 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Dream Images of the Collective Unconscious:

Their Transformative Healing Power

Presented by Robert Moradi, M.D.

In this theoretical and experiential presentation, participants will have the opportunity to work through a dream from a Jungian perspective. Using amplification, active imagination, as well as the four functions, we will discuss ways of elaborating dream images, including how to distinguish between images from the personal vs. the collective unconscious; demonstrate the use of alchemy in interpreting dream images; and explore the role of developmental theories as a means of illuminating the ways in which a dream can shed light and explain certain aspects of the dreamer’s life situation and personal history. In particular, we will focus on and witness some of the ways in which the power and energy contained in a dream have the potential to heal and transform the psyche.

Learning Objectives:

  • Give an example of images that originate in the collective unconscious.
  • Describe some of the differences between images from the personal vs the collective unconscious.
  • Describe what is meant by the term active imagination, and how it is applied. to dream work.
  • Describe what is meant by amplification and how it is utilized in dream work.
  • Give an example of an alchemical image and its relevance to understanding a contemporary psychological experience.
  • Give an example of how to interpret a dream from a developmental perspective using information from a patient’s personal history.

Robert Moradi, M.D. is a Jungian analyst at the C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles and a board-certified psychiatrist in private practice in Santa Monica. He is clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA School of Medicine. Currently, he teaches and writes on Jungian approaches to clinical practice.


Saturday, March 14, 2020; 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Alchemy and the Self

Presented by Pamela Power, Ph.D

Jung utilized the symbolic system of alchemy and the concept of the Self to describe the psychotherapeutic process on somatic, emotional and cognitive levels. He likened the therapeutic relationship to the alchemical vessel, which serves to contain and metabolize primitive mental states.  The Self is a notion that describes the integration of disparate or dissociated parts of the psyche. Defenses that inhibit these processes will be discussed in light of current research on mentalization. A selection of images from Jung’s research on alchemy will be used to amplify these themes and processes.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe what is meant by Jung’s notion of the Self as an integrative process.
  • Describe an alchemical process as a metaphor of a psychotherapeutic process.
  • Describe what is meant by a primitive mental state.
  • Describe what is meant by a mentalizing intervention.
  • Describe an intervention that can help a patient mentalize a primitive mental state.
  • Describe two corrective mentalizing interventions that address obsessive or depressive states.
  • Describe a mentalizing intervention that facilitates the coniunctio, the integration of the psyche.

Pamela Power, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist and Jungian analyst with a private practice in Santa Monica. She is a past Clinic Director and past Training Director at the C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles.


Saturday, April 18, 2020; 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

The Evolution of Jung’s Progressive View of the Psyche 

Presented by Bradley A. TePaske, Ph.D.

C.G. Jung observes that “anything psychic is Janus-faced – it looks both backwards and forwards.  Because it is evolving it is also preparing the future.”  Drawing on Red Book translator Sonu Shamdasani’s Jung and the Making of Modern Psychology, this presentation will examine some of the ways in which Jung’s work enlarged our understanding both of regressive as well as progressive aspects of the psyche, particularly as revealed in dreams, fantasy, the transference, and the process of individuation. Attention will be given to crucial influences on Jung’s evolving science, including Henri Bergson, Théodore Flournoy, Wolfgang Pauli, Jung’s Zurich colleague, Alphonse Maeder, among others.

Learning Objectives:

  • Give an example of regressive development in the therapeutic process.
  • Give an example of progressive development in the therapeutic process
  • Give an example of a primary affective states and concurrent imagery which is reflected either in a memory, dream or active imagination.
  • Give an example of two historical figures who influenced Jung’s understanding of psychological processes.
  • Give an example of the collaborative aspect of Jung’s development of the progressive view of psychic life and the individuation process.
  • Describe the decisive role played by the prevailing philosophy of science in a particular era, e.g., causal-mechanistic vs. acausal-synchronistic as a means of understanding the development of psychological processes.

Bradley A. TePaske, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and clinical psychologist in private practice in Pacific Palisades and Los Angeles. Trained at the C. G. Jung Institute Zurich, he is also a religious historian versed in Gnosticism, Graeco-Roman Mystery Religions and Shamanism, the author of Sexuality and the Religious Imagination and an accomplished graphic artist.


Saturday, May 9, 2020; 10:00 am – 1:30 pm

Psychology of the Transference

Presented by Carmen Kobor, Ph.D

This presentation will focus on the way individuation expresses itself in the transference relationship.  We will examine the main psychological concepts Jung discovered in the alchemical symbolism of the Rosarium Philosophorum, their relevance to the transference phenomena, and implication in clinical practice. We will examine the theoretical similarities and differences between Freud and Jung’s view of the transference, and describe how the Jungian psychological concept of the transference can be applied in psychotherapeutic practice.

Learning Objectives:

  • List three differences between Freud and Jung’s view of the transference.
  • Describe the role of projection in the transference and its implications for treatment.
  • Describe how a symbolic representation of the transference can be evident in a patient’s dream material.
  • Explain what Jung meant by prima materia (prime matter) as a symbol of the presenting problem, complex, or symptom, and the significance the concept has in psychotherapeutic practice.
  • Describe the various transference stages as described in the Rosarium Philosophorum and their relevance to clinical practice.

Carmen Kobor, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Beverly Hills and a member of the faculty at the C. G. Jung Institute of LA.  Her area of interest is the transformation of the psyche, and recently lectured on the subject in Dublin, Ireland, in a talk entitled The Crucible of Soul Logos.

Saturday, May 9, 2020; 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm

The Devil in the Room:

The Affect of Evil

Presented by Michael Gellert, M.A., L.C.S.W.

“You know evil when you are in its presence. I think you do, anyway. You feel it as a vibration, a hum that seems to emanate almost from a disorder of the molecules.” – Lance Morrow, Evil: An Investigation

What is evil?  Is it a divine force, or a psychic one—or both? Or is it neither, but rather only the absence of good, as St. Augustine believed? In this talk we will explore these questions, as well as what the phenomenon we call “evil” feels like when it emerges in the consulting room, including our counter-transference response when this material is evoked in the context of the analytic relationship.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the concept of evil from a psychological perspective.
  • Give an example of the emergence of evil in the clinical setting, either in dream material or in an interaction between patient and therapist.
  • Describe the role of the countertransference in responding to the emergence of evil in a patient’s material.

Michael Gellert, M.A., L.C.S.W,  is a Jungian analyst practicing in Los Angeles and Pasadena, and former Director of Training of the C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles. He is the author of Modern Mysticism, The Way of the Small, The Divine Mind, and America’s Identity Crisis.


Saturday, June 13, 2020; 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Archetypes and Symbols in the Individuation Process

Presented by Rose-Emily Rothenberg, M.A., M.F.T.

This presentation will explore the role of archetypes and symbols in the process of individuation. When we focus our energies on the archetypes and symbols that continue to appear in dreams and inspirations, renewed interpretations emerge. By becoming conscious of the archetypes and symbols that are constellated and by achieving an individual relationship to them, we can discover how they are part of our psychology and can become significant guides for the inner and outer journeys of our transformation. Specific focus will be on the orphan archetype in this presentation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the importance of archetypes and symbols in dreams in the context of psychotherapy.
  • Give an example of how to differentiate between personal and archetypal symbols in dream material.
  • Give an example of how archetypes emerge when an individual understands their personal history.
  • Describe what is meant by the term individuation, and how working with symbols can further this process.
  • Using the archetype of the orphan, describe the evolution of an individuation process.
  • Give an example of how the inner journey of analysis can lead to behavioral changes in attitude and outer relationships.

Rose-Emily Rothenberg, M.A., M.F.T., is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Pacific Palisades, California. A member of the faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles, she has lectured nationally and internationally on the topics of psyche/body and the orphan archetype. She is the author of An Orphan’s Odyssey: Sacred Journeys to Renewal (2015) and The Jewel in the Wound: How the Body Expresses the Needs of the Psyche and Offers a Path to Transformation (2001), both published by Chiron.


Learning Objectives for Case Consultation:

  • Describe the transference/countertransference field and how it manifests in the consulting room;
  • Identify how complexes are manifested in projection;
  • Describe what is meant by an analytic or symbolic attitude towards the unconscious;
  • Explain how Jungian analysis is different from other analytic schools of thought;
  • Describe what is meant by the role of symbol formation in analysis, what contributes and what inhibits this process;
  • Describe what is meant by the ego-Self axis and give an example from clinical practice;
  • Describe what is meant by a complex and give an example from clinical practice;
  • Describe what is meant by the personal shadow, and give an example from clinical practice;
  • Describe what is meant by the collective shadow, and give an example;
  • Describe what is meant by the Anima and give an example from clinical practice;
  • Describe what is meant by Animus and give a clinical example;
  • Describe what is meant by an archetype, and give an example from clinical practice;
  • Describe what is meant by a complex having an archetypal core;
  • Describe how to use imagery from a myth or fairy tale as a means of amplifying a psychological experience;
  • Explain how typology affects the development of the personality using a clinical example;
  • Describe what is meant by projection and give an example from clinical practice;
  • Describe active imagination and how to work with it in clinical practice;
  • Describe the difference between ego versus Self perspective in dream interpretation;
  • Discuss the difference between a reductive vs an amplification approach to working with dreams;
  • Give an example of how the transference can manifest in a patient’s dream;
  • Give an example of how an archetypal theme manifests in dreams;
  • Describe the role of transference in the analytic process;
  • Describe the role of countertransference in the analytic process;
  • Describe the personal and archetypal aspects of the transference;
  • Describe how the therapist’s typology can affect one’s work with patients using a clinical example.